Sep
29
2014

Reblogged from literarynerd :

"I’ve been reading Pride and Prejudice on and off all my life and it doesn’t wear out a bit.”

-C. S. Lewis in a letter to his goddaughter, Sarah, dated January 16, 1954 (excerpt from C. S. Lewis: His Letters to Children)

(Source: simplybookdrunk)

Sep
29
2014

Reblogged from booksthatmatter :

booksthatmatter:

Congratulations to The Lorax, Blooming Twig’s very first Book of the Week! Suzanne Wallach told us why she thinks The Lorax is a book that matters:

The Lorax by Dr. Seuss will always be at the top of my list of favorite books. It not only appeals to the intended younger audiences, but to their parents as well. My first encounter with The Lorax was as a young child. I had selected it from the library even though I was too young to read yet. The drawings of the Truffula Trees and Barbaloots captured my imagination. My mother delighted in reading it to me, and The Lorax and I became fast friends. As I grew and was given my own copy of the book, I felt the importance of the story of The Lorax and how each and every one of us is responsible for our surroundings and our behaviors. Thanks to Dr. Seuss, I understood how pollution and irresponsibility can be so harmful, not just to yourself, but to everyone and everything you come in contact with.

As a parent now myself, I have a greater appreciation for Dr. Seuss’ message through The Lorax. It also saddens me to know how long ago this message was sent and still goes largely unheeded. I am proud to say I can almost quote the entirety of The Lorax cover to cover, and often do. Dr. Seuss not only had the ability to engage a child with his whimsical drawings, but also to teach them an important lesson without preaching to them. The Lorax is timeless and I can’t wait to read it to the next generation. After all, “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.”

Sep
28
2014

Reblogged from beautifulbookborrower :

msjaneeyre:

There once was a child named Eyre

Who was born without much pomp or flair

Her childhood was shitty

She never got pretty

But she married rich, so, so THERE

Sep
27
2014

Banned Books Week: American Psycho
"…there is an idea of a Patrick Bateman, some kind of abstraction, but there is no real me, only an entity, something illusory, and though I can hide my cold gaze and you can shake my hand and feel flesh gripping yours and maybe you can even sense our lifestyles are probably comparable: I simply am not there.”

For this year’s Banned Books Week, I chose to read American Psycho for the first time. I gotta say, this book is intense. There is a looooooooooot of graphic sex and violence. That’s not to say that the sex and violence are gratuitous; they do contribute to the plot and overall themes. 
All that aside, Ellis’ novel lays some very heavy accusations against American culture, particularly the materialism portion of it. I thought it was interesting that every chapter featured a listing of the character’s outfits (down to the designer), a mention of The Patty Winters Show and a description of some sort of music. Patrick Bateman lives a charade of a human life; he relies of rote memorization to provide him with topics of conversation. This makes for a super bizarre feeling while reading the novel. The violent sex and violent…violence makes for a stark contrast to this otherwise vapid existence. Bateman begins to unravel as the book progresses and even dissociates from himself. It becomes hard to tell what is real and what is happening only in his imagination. Everyone he interacts with is so wrapped up in their own world that they barely even notice when Bateman looks them straight in the eye and declares that he disemboweled three prostitutes last night or whatever heinous mutilation he committed. There is nothing meaningful in their lives to anchor them, so all the characters whirl through life, meaninglessly consuming and destroying. Bateman is just the extreme version. 
Ellis’ novel may be incredibly graphic, but all of this adds to the feeling of uneasiness that pervades the book. The reader isn’t supposed to enjoy reading descriptions of mutilating women or harassing bums. This book serves as a warning for the dangers of mindless consumption and buying into culture without questioning it.
These are important lessons that should not be censored. 
Thanks for following along with me this year! I hope you continue to enjoy these previously censored books and continue to fight for awareness rather than fearful gut reactions.

Banned Books Week: American Psycho

"…there is an idea of a Patrick Bateman, some kind of abstraction, but there is no real me, only an entity, something illusory, and though I can hide my cold gaze and you can shake my hand and feel flesh gripping yours and maybe you can even sense our lifestyles are probably comparable: I simply am not there.”

For this year’s Banned Books Week, I chose to read American Psycho for the first time. I gotta say, this book is intense. There is a looooooooooot of graphic sex and violence. That’s not to say that the sex and violence are gratuitous; they do contribute to the plot and overall themes. 

All that aside, Ellis’ novel lays some very heavy accusations against American culture, particularly the materialism portion of it. I thought it was interesting that every chapter featured a listing of the character’s outfits (down to the designer), a mention of The Patty Winters Show and a description of some sort of music. Patrick Bateman lives a charade of a human life; he relies of rote memorization to provide him with topics of conversation. This makes for a super bizarre feeling while reading the novel. The violent sex and violent…violence makes for a stark contrast to this otherwise vapid existence. Bateman begins to unravel as the book progresses and even dissociates from himself. It becomes hard to tell what is real and what is happening only in his imagination. Everyone he interacts with is so wrapped up in their own world that they barely even notice when Bateman looks them straight in the eye and declares that he disemboweled three prostitutes last night or whatever heinous mutilation he committed. There is nothing meaningful in their lives to anchor them, so all the characters whirl through life, meaninglessly consuming and destroying. Bateman is just the extreme version. 

Ellis’ novel may be incredibly graphic, but all of this adds to the feeling of uneasiness that pervades the book. The reader isn’t supposed to enjoy reading descriptions of mutilating women or harassing bums. This book serves as a warning for the dangers of mindless consumption and buying into culture without questioning it.

These are important lessons that should not be censored. 

Thanks for following along with me this year! I hope you continue to enjoy these previously censored books and continue to fight for awareness rather than fearful gut reactions.

Sep
26
2014

Banned Books Week: A Wrinkle In Time

A Wrinkle in Time is another one of those that is rarely actually banned, but faces many, many challenges. From accusations of Satanic worship, to overtly religious tones, to equating Jesus with Gandhi, L’Engle’s famous work has encounter many contradicting challenges. The book was even rejected by 26 publishers because it featured a female lead.

Now that’s just nonsense. 

Sep
25
2014

Banned Books Week: The Handmaid’s Tale

It is no surprise that Margaret Atwood’s heavy feminist tale was banned at some point. With themes that rail against religious fundamentalism and sexual repression, this book is bound set the teeth of very conservative parents on edge. 

Fun Fact: This particular cover has always haunted me because i thought it looked like the handmaid on the front was staring into the wall, hoping that it would open up and let her out. 

Sep
24
2014

Banned Books Week: The Grapes of Wrath

Steinbeck’s classic work was actually on the receiving end of burnings and bannings. People thought it was communist propaganda, and you know how well that goes over in America (spoiler alert, it doesn’t). Many of Steinbeck’s works have been seen as controversial, but this one really demonstrates his views on the inherent unfairness of society, particularly a capitalist society. 

Sep
23
2014

Reblogged from astrangerhere :

"They’re certainly entitled to think that, and they’re entitled to full respect for their opinions… but before I can live with other folks I’ve got to live with myself. The one thing that doesn’t abide by majority rule is a person’s conscience."

Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird (challenged/banned for racism, use of rape as a plot device being “immoral” (1966), language). (via astrangerhere)

Sep
23
2014

Reblogged from librawrian :

Which Banned Book Are You?

I got Tropic of Cancer by Henry Miller. 

Sep
23
2014

Banned Books Week: A Heart of Darkness

And this stillness of life did not in the least resemble a peace. It was the stillness of an implacable force brooding over an inscrutable intention. 

This one is filed under the “Too Political” section of banned-books.org. Complaints leveled against Conrad’s anti-colonialism novella include excess use of the n-word and violent content. I always love when American schools ban books for the n-word; it’s so ironic.

They are missing the point 

Sep
22
2014

Banned Books Week: A Light In The Attic

image

There are no happy endings, endings are sad-so let’s have a happy beginning and a happy middle.

This book has been banned for encouraging messiness, disobedience and mention of the supernatural. Some people just can’t handle the delightful whimsy of Shel Silverstein. 

Sep
21
2014

I finally got this book…mainly because Rosamund Pike is in the movie.

I finally got this book…mainly because Rosamund Pike is in the movie.

Sep
21
2014

It’s That Time of Year Again….

Banned Books Week! Today kicks off a week long celebration of books that have been banned from schools, libraries or even whole countries! From seemingly innocent Shel Silverstein to gritty and raw Toni Morrison, these books get an unnecessary bad rap. So stay tuned for spotlights and reviews of some of my favorite “inappropriate” books to read. 

Sep
18
2014

Reblogged from fuckyeahbrontes :

lunaesquephotography:

Lunaesque Creative Photography - Wuthering Heights
Costume - The Dark Angel Design Co

now that is pretty cool

lunaesquephotography:

Lunaesque Creative Photography - Wuthering Heights

Costume - The Dark Angel Design Co

now that is pretty cool

Sep
17
2014

Book vs. TV: Hemlock Grove Edition

                           Awesome cover art by Matt Buck.

You know it, the one where she’s in her cheerleading uniform and smiling not for the camera, but for her sister or her best friend or a boy or any countless things to put one on her face, when she had one. The Picture, pornographic with tragedy.

In place of a traditional review, I am doing a comparison type review of the book Hemlock Grove and the Netflix series of the same name. I will be sticking to the first season of the show, as it is the only season that Brian McGreevy had an active role in and the only season that follows the plot of the book. The second season is merely an expansion on the characters from the novel. This will be a long read, so check out the rest of my analysis under the cut! Spoilers abound!

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